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How to Find Early Adopters

It is still amazing to me after working with hundreds of students and entrepreneurs for many years how quickly everyone wants to build solutions. I guess it makes sense – that is the “fun” part – but I try, often in vain, to get my students to understand that time spent engaging with customers now will exponentially increase their chances of 1) killing bad ideas sooner and 2) building solutions people actually want.

Which Customers are Early Adopters?

While some will argue that early adopters can’t be found, I push my students hard to think through what segments would be ideal early adopters, meaning people who:

  1. have the problem my students are trying to solve
  2. know they have the problem, and
  3. are actively seeking a solution

Where Are My Early Adopters?

In two modules of FOCUS Framework, we learn how to differentiate customers into early adopter, early majority, late majority and laggard buckets based on the 3 categories above, then we map out 4 or 5 of our own customer segments. What I particularly like about this exercise it is forces us to think about what behaviors early adopters engage in, and then to dig one important step deeper, what externally observable behaviors they engage in. For instance, for my idea of delivering on demand career advice to college students, behaviors early adopters would engage in might include:

  1. Searches Glassdoor for career advice
  2. Gets advice from university career center
  3. Googles “how to prepare for a job interview”
  4. Attends career preparedness workshops
  5. Googles “best resume template”

But I cannot identify what specific individuals are engaging in these behaviors, and thereby targeting them for problem interviews. So I need to convert these behaviors to actions they take that allows me to identify who they are, and ideally, make contact with them. The behaviors become:

  1. Reviews Glassdoor
  2. Reviews career center on the career center Facebook page
  3. Tweets with #interview or #jobsearch or #employment
  4. Reviews career-related workshops on the workshop Facebook event page

Now I know where I can start looking for potential early adopters. I have trolled my university’s various Facebook pages and Twitter accounts related to our career center and related events and groups, and have found a plethora of students there who are providing very passionate reviews (both positive and negative). Targeting customers in this way allows me to be much more productive in my customer development.