Tag Archives: failure

Where Do We Go From Here?

Missing In Action

Missing In Action

It’s been a whirlwind few weeks while I’ve been missing in action. TEDxNormal is quickly coming up, which I have been organizing for many months. My new venture, Legacy Out Loud, is partnering to produce the after-party for Women’s Entrepreneurship Day on November 19th in New York City, so I’ve been hustling to make that happen with zero budget. Yup, a super high-end party in Manhattan with no budget. Talk about taking a risk!!!!!!! I was honored to give a keynote speech at the annual conference of the National Association for Community College Entrepreneurship and also a workshop about my approach to this class. And, most importantly, I received the prestigious ATHENA Leadership Award for my contributions to inspiring and encouraging the empowerment of female leaders. Oh yeah, and teaching, and family, and eating and sleeping, and . . . .

Back to School

Class is plugging along. The students wrapped up the Online Venture Challenge (OVC). It was a pretty disappointing exercise, to be honest. I consider it a small success and a large failure on my part. I realize I did not present enough setup structure for the students and enough encouragement. Of course, my point with this class is to introduce them to an opportunity and let them decide what to do with it. In this case, though, I fear they may not have understood the opportunity. A few teams made a profit, but only around the $100 range. A few had a few customers (8 or 10). Nothing mind-blowing, nothing impressive. They underwhelmed me, both with their effort and their performance. My lesson learned is to create more excitement at the beginning of the month, and to create more pain if they don’t engage.

Here’s where my philosophy gets tested – do I let the failure be theirs, do I share in the failure, do I take ownership of the failure?

Tomorrow we will debrief the OVC and I’ll see what they have to say about the experience and hopefully that gives me some fodder to adjust the experience for next semester.

On Deck

On Deck

Now we turn 100% to the individual project – starting a business. I have scheduled 30 minute phone calls with each student to check in with where they are, what they need, etc. I have encouraged them to provide me the following details so I can get them encouragement and feedback:

  1. The problem they are attempting to solve.
  2. The customer who experiences the most pain with that problem.
  3. The solution they are proposing to build.
  4. Their routine. I want to know how they will stay productive, and have encouraged them to have a routine. I presented them with the concept of a Lean Sprint as one model, but condensed into 5 days – one stage per day. I really don’t care what their routine is, but I tell them they better have one so they stay on task and don’t let themselves slack.

I have received nothing from any of them. I know a few of them are working on ideas, a few are actually at the point of messing around with prototypes in preparation of our big student startup competition here at ISU in a few weeks. But I don’t hear from them.

Next conversation is about experiments. I will again explain them in the context of Diana Kander’s tools – determining and documenting the goal, the hypothesis, the subject, the logistics, the currency, and the success and failure criteria. I hope they jump in the pool instead of sitting on the sidelines or just dipping their big toe in!

My Work

I am already getting excited about next semester. I have ideas of how to better incorporate the Online Venture Challenge – I will make it a competition with students from other schools using the tool, I will model for them the behavior I’m looking for, and I will do a much better job of setting up better structure to get them some forward inertia. I also learned about rejection therapy, and am giddy to include that next semester so my students (and I) get better at accepting rejection. Rejection Therapy

I think I will also incorporate some sort of rhythm to the individual project portion of the class. Like the Lean Sprint idea. I’ll have to figure out how to balance doing that with letting the students have their own experience.

With my business, I am off and running. I have validated my assumption that professionals would give 15 minutes of their time once a week to talk to students interested in their line of work. I called 40 professionals in my network (a broad variety of industries and tenures), and 37 of them said they would donate 15 minutes per week. I then set up a basic landing page with this very simple request: “Many college students are interested in learning more about your job, your employer, your industry. Provide your email address if you would be willing to spend 15 minutes per week answering these students’ questions.” Of those 40 professionals I talked to, 34 provided email addresses. Hypothesis validated (30 of 40 professionals would donate 15 minutes per week to talk to college students interested in learning more about their job)!

I also validated my assumption that students would want to spend 15 minutes talking to a professional about a job they’re interested in. I talked to 40 ISU students – 10 junior business students, 10 senior business students, 10 freshman, and 10 sophomores, 20 male 20 female. Of these, 35 said they would (the 5 who didn’t were freshman, which didn’t surprise me). I think the seniors and some juniors were actually drooling when I was talking to them 🙂 I then set up a basic landing page with this very simple request: “Provide your email address if you would be willing to spend 15 minutes asking work-related questions to a professional who has a job you’re interested in pursuing.” Of those 40 students I talked to, 38 provided their email address. Perhaps the freshman thought about it a little bit after we talked and changed their mind!

So, next steps are to validate the revenue model. My assumption is that students will be willing to pay for this connection. I can’t imagine professionals would pay for it. So, I will talk to more students and set up a preorder landing page to run this experiment. I will talk to and drive 50 students to the landing page and success is if 25% preorder. If 12 students preorder, I will set up a very basic Carbon site to begin gathering student and professional info and make matches. I will also have to likely hunt down professionals to match up with students as they sign up. If this has any legs, it can be an on-ramp for one of my student’s businesses (NuGrad), and another of my businesses (internrocket).

Time to Launch

This week got a lot more serious. We did Justin Wilcox’ 60 Minutes to Launch as a class on Monday, and got goin on the Online Venture Challenge on Wednesday.

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Just Launch

I have been a big fan of Justin Wilcox’ work for some time. He and I keep circling some of the same goals, connecting here and there, brainstorming here and there. I have been impatiently waiting to try his 60 Minutes to Launch exercise in my class. Since my class is 75 minutes long, it is perfect! He recommends splitting into three teams:

  1. Landing Page
  2. Video
  3. Payments

I struggled all week with how to implement this in class. I could have the entire class work on one project, or split students into many small groups to work on their own projects. I went with the class working on one project. Honestly, I’m not 100% sure why – as is my nature, I made the decision as I was walking into class. I think I was hoping that way we could all talk about a common context. As I do frequently, I chose wrong! 5 or 6 students wanted to be on the landing page team. Too many. 7 or 8 students wanted to be on the video team. Too many. The remaining 20 or so students wanted to be on the payments team. WAAAAY too many.

In debriefing with Justin after the class, he explained to me his strategy when he uses this exercise in workshops and events. He has people form teams of 3 (maybe 4 at most). And he encourages/forces people to do the thing they don’t want to. So the creative mind who is good with video needs to work on landing page or payments. The more technical folk who want to work on landing page or payments need to work on the creative video piece. Why? This way, people understand just how painless it can be to put on another hat. From now on, anytime I use this (which I plan on doing at the upcoming NACCE conference and also at the upcoming USASBE conference) I will use this approach.

The Big (Bad) Idea

I also gave my students the idea. For many semesters I’ve heard complaints from male and female students about male gift-giving behavior (or lack thereof!) in relationships. Very generally speaking, the feedback I hear when I push further is that

  1. The men don’t enjoy gift giving and aren’t sure what to get
  2. The women don’t appreciate men putting it off to the last minute, which often results in lame gifts
  3. The women even more so don’t appreciate the men forgetting important dates (birthday, anniversary, etc)

I explained the idea and rationale to the class. They mostly agreed it was a problem, although a few questioned how big a problem it was. We proceeded with this idea – a service where young men could go to reserve and/or purchase a customized gift basket for their significant other.

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Students got to work on http://www.gifttotherescue.com/ (it didn’t last long – don’t bother trying to find it). They created a landing page, a video (Mission Impossible style – very clever!) and payment capability. As Justin implores and reminds, it was done but certainly not perfect.

  1. We had a functioning landing page with payment system for pre-orders before class ended. But many students missed a big part of the learning opportunity. Very small teams next time will encourage the engagement I was seeking.
  2. Students understood that done is better than perfect
  3. Students saw how “easy” it can be to put something into the world

Mission (mostly) accomplished! Thanks for the great exercise Justin.

The Next Challenge

Next class I introduced the students to the Online Venture Challenge. This is a fantastic program that costs students very little, can be a short module in a class, and engages them in powerful learning as they start, run and liquidate a “business”. I am using the next month for this activity in my class. Geoff Archer shared some great resources with me that he has developed and uses with this – master grading sheet, slide deck, etc. I gave students the context, gave them the basic structure, gave them the basic grading buckets (design of site, power of the site, performance overall – with lots of ways to triangulate within those buckets per the master grading sheet). I told them they needed to

  1. Identify a local charity to support (after this exercise is done, the teams have to donate all proceeds to the charity). I let students choose to pay themselves back their initial investment if they’d like ($25) – let’s see who is greedy and who is not!
  2. Identify something they can sell through their Shopify store that aligns with that charity’s mission.

All groups emerged from this class with a team in place, with a charity to work with, and a basic idea to begin with. I was a little baffled by a couple ideas, and very impressed with two ideas in particular.

One tweak I put on Geoff’s process was to inject myself into the competition (at the end of the day, students see this as a competition where they have to beat the other teams). On Monday, the students have the chance to pitch me on why I should join their team. If one pitch strikes me more than any other, I will join that team. I told them it is not guaranteed I will join a team, so they really needed to move me with a pitch.

Wrap-up and Looking Forward

It was a great week, for me and for the students. They experience the pain, confusion, and excitement of creating something and putting it into the world with the 60 Minutes to Launch exercise. They got moving on their first big challenge with the Online Venture Challenge (OVC).

Next week, we will officially start the OVC, and will also begin reading Diana Kander’s All In Startup, which will provide some guidance and background to what they need to do to succeed in the OVC and in their eventual individual leap into starting a business.

I’m interested to see the pitches on Monday to see what students think will move me.

Straight Outta Normal

Leap of faith

Week 1 is in the books, and my students took the leap of faith!

Let’s Get It On: Day 1

I had told the students before class started that on Monday to meet me in the little shopping district just off campus called Uptown Normal. Here are some picturcombine_imageses of their environment:

 

 

 

 

As students showed up, I gave the first one 10 $1 bills, and the next three I told were in a group with that first person. As each 5th student showed up, I began the process again. You can imagine their curiosity and anxiety when on the first day of class they have to meet away from campus, and their teacher is handing them cash with no explanation. Once all students arrived, I announced (some version of this):

“You have 35 minutes to make as much money as possible. Each group has 10 $1 bills [some actually had 15 bills and 5 members because a few stragglers showed up and I had to wing it]. Look around you – there is a CVS, there are plenty of stores, there are a wide variety of people walking around and sitting. There is a hotel and conference center. There is a hotel being constructed. There are cars everywhere. Whichever group LEGALLY makes the most money gets all the cash. I’ll see you back in the room at 2:45″

I saw mostly shock and confusion. Not a whole lot of excitement. But also not a whole lot of fear (likely because those with fear could lean on the group dynamic to cover it up and/or hide it). I walked back to my car super excited to see what they would come up with.

The Delivery

I was impressed that all the groups seemed to accept the challenge and at least engage with some enthusiasm (after all, there was at least $80 in the pot, plus whatever profit they made). The group that won made $27 profit. Nothing earth shattering. But profit. In 35 minutes. All other groups except one made something; one group lost 76 cents [I’m still not quite sure how that happened]. The most common strategy seemed to be buying bottled water and reselling it. Nothing shocking there. The groups that made some profit headed back to campus and sold it to college students. The group that won headed over to the Hyatt Place hotel being built and sold it to the construction workers.

Bottled Water

Quick Lessons Learned

  1. The money is a distraction. Most students will immediately think of what they can buy to resell. I purposely planted or reinforced this seed by pointing out the CVS only a block away.
  2. Selling anything to college students is difficult if you want to make a profit. They are usually on a budget. They are usually in a hurry.

The Debrief

We talked about the variety of approaches to this experience. I tried to hammer home the idea that money is a distraction and that it is a bad idea to spend first and then figure out how to dig out of that hole. Instead, I introduced the idea of focusing on the potential customers. Identifying a problem they might have and figuring out how to solve it. There were plenty of individuals and plenty of businesses these students could have approached to interview and identify problems they could solve. Opportunity overlooked.

A few days after this class session I spoke with a friend of mine who related this story. Turns out she was standing on an adjacent corner from where the students started when the exercise went off. She had a $20 bill in her hand. A couple groups passed her by, but when one group caught her eye, she asked them if they were in my class. They said yes, so she showed them the $20 bill, explained she had money and wanted to know what they could do for her. Apparently, they had a very difficult time answering that question. Eventually one young woman mentioned social media, and my friend asked how many likes they could get her on Facebook and Instagram. The students floundered and didn’t get the money. How much easier could it have been?

In the end it was a fantastic exercise to introduce them to my course and to what I would be asking them to do the rest of the semester. They resoundingly said it was a good exercise and I should do it again, so I will. I was proud of the students for engaging [uncertainty is scary] and for being able to see the opportunities they missed.

Let’s Get It On: Day 2

How do I follow up that first day? With Idea Sex and Idea Math. As with most things, I don’t come up with these things, I just borrow them from others much smarter than I. In this case, these come from James Altucher, who is a genius in so very many ways.

Idea Sex

Idea Sex

I had each student make a list of things they loved, were passionate about. I then had them pair up and combine one from each person’s list. [Three guys got together and used three lists – referring to it as a threesome – gotta love college humor!] Most of the ideas were silly and really bad. The one I remember most was something about people paying to ice skate with a walrus. I mentioned how that was a terrible idea in so many ways, but that people might pay to ice skate with penguins (they are safe and cute) so they could work with the original nugget of an idea to arrive at a much more viable alternative. I encouraged them to write lists all the time – of things they observed, of thoughts they had about any random topic, of ideas they had. Anything, just as long as they were making lists, then they could come back to those lists and have Idea Sex anytime to keep their brain firing and to keep coming up with better and better ideas.

Idea Math

Next I asked one student for a food, an article of clothing, and a country [my memory is horrible – I should have taken notes – I think it was homemade macaroni and cheese, knee-high socks and Australia]

I had the students, in groups, come up with an idea (product, process, concept) that involved those three things. I should have written the ideas down [my memory is horrendous] – they were all pretty bad. One was using the sock to hold candies with Australia shapes that tasted like homemade macaroni and cheese I think. None of them stood out as anything with much potential.

I explained the concept behind addition, subtraction, multiplication and division in this context, and that each member of the group should take one operation and come up with a new version of the original idea. The ideas didn’t get much better, but brains were working.

Wrapping Up

This first week was an adventure, for the students and for me. I exposed them to uncertainty, to anxiety, to selling, to customer development, to ideation, to creativity, to frustration, to profitability, to winning. I feel good that they are excited, that they seem eager to engage and are anxious to dive in. I hope I can sustain that and continue to keep that flame burning bright.

60 Minutes

Next week is Justin Wilcox’ 60 Minutes to Launch exercise and introducing the Online Venture Challenge.

I Got Fired – Is That Bad?

The last time I got fired, I was 16 years old and I made a very conscious choice to party with my friends instead of show up to work. That was nearly 24 years ago. I got fired again a while ago. Not from my “food-on-the-table” job, but from a consulting sort of gig.

Getting Fired Sucks

It all boils down to fit. I did not fit with the direction the project was heading. I am always the first one to step out of the way if I’m going to impede progress of a good initiative – and this was a very good initiative. Fired due to lack of fit. Could be worse.

I will be the first to admit that I have a healthy ego and am pretty narcissistic. My wife will confirm this! Being fired does not suit my ego or narcissism very well, in fact it bruises it to some extent. That may not be a bad thing, but it certainly does not feel good. After the sting wore off, I began to think more deeply about being fired, what that means, and the opportunity that presents.

Getting Fired Isn’t So Bad

There are a number of reasons I came up with that getting fired isn’t so bad. Now, being a recovering addict, I realize this may be similar to making up excuses why today is a bad day to quit. However, here I go:

1. I have more time on my hands.

2. I have more intellectual bandwidth available for projects for which I am a good fit.

3. I reflect on my approach, my conversations, my interactions with people.

4. I have to review and update my CV (resume), my social media profiles.

5. I have to be humble with family, friends, colleagues. The family part stings pretty bad for one reason, and the colleagues part stings in an entirely different way. But equally as painful.

I have to reflect, I learn a little humility, I have more time and energy. None of those are a bad thing. Admittedly again, this is not my bread-and-butter job – that would be a different story. But any experience that requires us to reflect, to be humble, to take stock can’t be all that bad, can it?

Would You Fire Yourself?

This led me to look at other side gigs in my life right now. None of them are necessary; I took all of them on for one reason or another, but all I consider voluntary at this point. I asked myself if I would fire myself from any of them. This is a very tough inner journey that incorporates issues of self-worth, satisfaction, greed, narcissism, love, passion, and all things beautiful and ugly. I decided I would not fire myself from anything at this point.

On an intellectual level, I am not glad I was fired. I really enjoyed the possibility that project held to engage with a great audience and to accomplish something fantastic. On a more personal level, I can say I am somewhat glad I was fired – only because of the opportunity it presented me. I failed. In this particular project endeavor, I failed miserably. I put my everything into it, and I got fired. That failure presented a fantastic opportunity for me to pause, reflect, and learn. I am better for it (at least I will be next time around!)

My question to you: what would you fire yourself from?

I Am A Failure

Benefits of Failure

Complete, 100% failure. OK, maybe more like 95%. But pretty damn complete. One of my “goals” this semester was to start a business, just as I ask my students to do. Inherent in that goal is also to understand their experience. I now get it! I intended to raise nearly $5,000 through my business to buy my wife a fancy suitcase. Not going to happen most likely. Because I have yet to achieve even $1 in sales.

My son asked me yesterday how I was doing in my class. I would give myself an F if I was grading myself (like I ask my students to).

What Failure Looks Like

My plate is too full. I have other responsibilities. I will eventually get to it. The laundry list of excuses and justifications for my lack of progress can be long. I had a plan to build a basic website (check – see the down and dirty version here). I had a plan to push this to the student population across ISU, using Facebook and some basic marketing methods. No check there – never got to this. I will still try to crank this up, but given there’s only one month left of the semester and the weather is super nice out, students have basically checked out (can’t blame them!)

oopsBottom line is that this is the one project that gets put on the backburner when I get too “busy”. In this experiment I am only accountable to myself. In other businesses I am founding, I am accountable to my co-founders. At school I am accountable to colleagues. Those are “more important” on the surface. However, now I realize I need to be even more accountable to my students, especially given the craziness I ask them to jump into. So this class gets sidetracked. I feel terrible and almost ashamed. Not because I’ve failed in my experiment. If I was being honest, I basically expected that. I feel that was because I continue to ask my students to do something that I am not pretty sure is nearly impossible. They can achieve the goal of “starting a business”, I have no doubt. Students at other schools do this all the time. What is nearly impossible is for them to do this in the class the way I run it. Bottom line – they need a bit more structure.

Looking Forward to Alleviate Failure

I will restructure the class for the fall semester to include more checkpoints, a little more structure. I won’t do traditional assignments, won’t do tests, they will still be responsible for grading themselves. But I’ll go back to flipping the classroom, so I’ll deliver a bunch of video content ahead of time. Then one class will be dedicated to applying that learning. The other class that week will be dedicated to playing. Not games, but deep, meaningful, impactful playing. Applying learning at a whole different level (like the challenges I offered the students this semester). So now I get to work wrapping up this semester, and planning the next. I’ll be posting videos and content and updates on structure as I develop it. But I basically put a fork in this semester.

Other Bits and Pieces: The Chocolate Challenge

I gave my students one more challenge. In the spirit of the One Red Paperclip and the Marble Game, I gave groups of my students a Hershey’s bar each, and gave them the rest of the semester to see what they could uptrade for. No prize, no assignment. Just an experience and opportunity. I imagine not many will truly engage. Some will work in their groups as I expect them to and each take the bar for a week to see what they can do. Big mistake. HUGE! Because then they are not using all their resources (perhaps another group member knows the perfect person to trade with during that week????) I did hear from one students already who has so far been able to trade up to a Swiss Army Knife in 3 days. Impressive!

Education Comes Through Opportunity, Failure, Hustle

How does one succeed in education?  How does one succeed as an entrepreneur?

To me, three words:  OpportunityFailureHustle.

My Education

Opportunity

These three words define me and my path through life.  I grew up comfortable – not rich by any means (my father was a math professor after all and even though he was ridiculously intelligent and a workaholic, he was a math professor in the 1970s and 1980s of my youth).  My parents afforded me unbelievable opportunities.  Private school and boarding school.  Toys and books and sports – all the things important to a young boy.  Each opportunity came my way, and more often than not, I failed at realizing each one.  Not that I ever worked hard at them.  You see, I had an older sister, and she set a bar I felt I couldn’t reach.  I know, typical story, right?  So my parents thrust all these opportunities my way – all of them wonderful and some of them potentially life-changing.  But I failed, over and over again, by choice.

Failure

I failed at realizing the opportunities my parents so kindly placed before me.  Because I was convinced I couldn’t meet the bar my older sister set.  I accepted these failures, but didn’t learn to learn from them until I was much older.  See, failure, it turns out, is the most powerful learning force there is.  Fail at something, feel like shit, ashamed, embarrassed, guilty, angry, humiliated . . . whatever the feeling it’s not pleasant.  Stand up and choose to learn from that and I promise it’s a powerful learning experience.  I kept failing and not learning.  Until I figured out that there are good choices and there are bad choices.  My sister would always outdo me when it came to good choices.   She wasn’t a goody-two-shoes.  I always thought of those types as ones who really tried at being good, they had to work at it, and it was awkward.  My sister didn’t try, it was just natural.  It was her spirit.  I couldn’t compete with that.  I quickly found bad choices, and realized I could be really good at those.  I didn’t fail any more!  Now I was a success.  And to be a success at the bad choices, I had to hustle.

Hustle

We all hustle.  It’s that drive that pushes us toward a goal.  It’s that fire that wakes us up, that gets us through the day, that keeps us up at night.  Some of us hustle for good, some of us hustle for bad, some of us hustle for ourselves, some of us hustle for others.  But make no mistake – we all hustle.  It’s a beautiful thing!

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Photo Credit: C. Ha via Compfight cc

 

I saw opportunity all around me – kids getting high and paying lots of money to do it.  I had failed many times at trying to be “good”.  So I turned my hustle to dealing drugs.  I was good at this hustle.  For many years.  Learned to read people, learned to negotiate, learned to sell, learned about numbers and cash flow and profit and loss.  Learned about customer relationships and supplier relationships.  Learned about  . . . way a second, sounds real similar to the kinds of things my business school courses claimed to have taught me.  You know what?  I don’t remember shit from those courses.  But I remember all kinds of lessons I learned from the hustle.  So if we could make education a system where students hustle to realize opportunities and learn from failure, students would have a better learning experience.  That’s my hypothesis, and I’m sticking to it.  So what are these three elements about?  Why are they so important?

Opportunity

Opportunities bombard us every day, through every one of our senses.  They seriously do – while I at times enjoy this sensory overload, most days it drives me bananas.  Any time we hear someone bitching about something BOOM! that’s an opportunity.  Any time we see someone struggle with something – physically, mentally, emotionally – BOOM! that’s an opportunity.  Anytime you see or hear giddiness, BOOM!  that’s an opportunity. And then there are those times in the shower, in your car and other private moments we don’t need to discuss when those seemingly stupid ideas flood the dull moments.  Opportunities never stop – we just have to be alert to them.  It doesn’t take a rocket scientist, just someone who is in tune with their surroundings, and with them self.  Just pay attention to what the fuck is going on around you.  Stop trying to create opportunities and look and listen – there are more than enough already there waiting to be realized, there’s no need to undertake the impossible task of creating one.

Failure

So the opportunities are out there, so what?  So pick one that’s interesting and act on it. Take a class, talk to a group of interesting people, learn a craft, try a new food, travel to a new location, reverse-engineer a product.  The list goes on – but only if you care enough to hold down the off button and be alert.

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Photo Credit: عدسة شاب سوري – Young syrian’s Lens via Compfight cc

 

 

If someone wants to try and learn something, or wants to try their hand at entrepreneurship – if these are the opportunities that they seize, hate to say it but they’re likely going to fail.  So what?  We’ve been failing all our life – since we were trying to figure out how to roll over unsuccessfully.  Seriously – think about it.  You failed in school.  You failed in sports.  You failed socially.  Failure is as much a part of life as are opportunities. They co exist and keep us on our toes.   And give us a chance to hone the most valuable skill possible: hustling.

Hustle

Some people cringe at the word.  It kind of makes me glow.  I love to hustle.  I love to figure out how to make something happen.  I love to work under pressure.  It’s a beautiful thing!  Because it’s a universal language of getting shit done.  No matter where you are, no matter who you’re talking to, no matter how different you are, everyone understands hustling.  Because in order to avoid failure, we hustle.  In order to take advantage of opportunities, we hustle.  It’s a glorious cycle of sorts I guess.  It’s the action that connects opportunity and failure in an enduring circle.  Learn from one, then experience the other.

Education: Back To Why We’re Here

So what does this have to do with education?  Education is at a crossroads, on a precipice, whatever one wants to call it, it’s a critical juncture.  We can proceed with the standard Baby Boomer model delivering education.  Or we can implement a more Millenial standard of hustling.  There are so many opportunities now being created in the educational technology space.  Technology enables educators to share resources and experiences in real-time.  The opportunities are endless to disrupt this tired, broken model of education.  Failure is inevitable, because we’re dealing with extraordinarily bureaucratic support.  Because it’s a new frontier.  Because while the possibilities are endless, it doesn’t mean all of them are good ones.  But we need to start trying them out.  We need to start hustling.  No more talking (you hear me you stodgy old academics?)  Get off your asses, forget about your conservative ways of approaching education, and start disrupting.  Be entrepreneurial.  Hustle!